The Capitalism of Unsatisfied Bodies"

Book Excerpt from “The Capitalism of Unsatisfied Bodies”Book Excerpt from “The Capitalism of Unsatisfied Bodies”

Do you remember India Arie, wrote a song dedicated to women which encourages them to appreciate their hair?

I am not my hair,

I am not this skin,

I am not your expectations no no,

I am not my hair,

I am not this skin,

I am a soul that lives within.

Whatever must have prompted India Arie to write this song with such deep lyrics cannot be over emphasized that the lady in the story of the lyrics had been defined by the way her hair looked.

Having a certain type of hair does not make you different from the other person. Desiring to have the kind of hair on another lady’s hair because you think your hair is not good enough is the issue.

Why do you think your hair is not good enough?

Why would you not just fix the hair extensions, because you like it, because you are almost certain it would suit your facial structure or because it’s something you want to try out.

Why do you think if you had long straight curly hair you would look more attractive than the other girl in school, appear more sophisticated or come across as beautiful enough to get the good-looking boys rushing to your DM.

 A woman’s hair is her crown. It is the covering over her intellect and it is her identity. When a woman comes to appreciate her hair for the way it is and begins to style it in the way she feels comfortable with.

She becomes a Satisfied Body. Even if she tries to be adventurous with her hairstyles, the satisfaction of her body comes from the willingness to improve on her body for her own happiness, not on the premise of outshining another person or trying to belong to a tribe that does not recognize the authenticity of her being.

When a lady begins to style her hair on the premise of comparison, her dissatisfaction becomes evident. She is no longer her hair. She has lost her first identity.

A woman’s hair is her identity. It announces her when she walks into a room, even before she exchanges pleasantries, her hair is the attraction.

If she carries a hair she is truly satisfied with, her aura envelopes the room with a smile of contentment. When a woman has hair, she has made out of spite or in the fit to outdo another, her aura reeks of arrogance.

It is the ooze of an Unsatisfied Body that desperately wants to be acknowledged for doing something that is in trend.

 At that instance, she does not recognize the exploitation that has played out on her confidence and her pockets.

Capitalism begins to take place when she has to meet the demands of using hair products that are way expensive than she can afford.

It begins to creep into her confidence when she can no longer make such hairstyles.

She feels unloved, not worthy of being in the same room with other bodies. She begins to lose her self and sense of worth.

About the Author:-

The Capitalism of Unsatisfied Bodies"

Francisca Ogechi Okwulehie is a Professional Writing Coach with Moncoeur Global Concept.She provides ghost writing, coaching and editing services.

 She is the Author of ‘A Preacher’s Secret’ and ‘Tari’s Golden Fleece.’

Her educational background in Philosophy and Journalism has given her an exceptional narrative writing style.

She holds a B.A and an M.A in Philosophy from the University of Lagos, Nigeria. She possesses a Certificate in the Fundamentals of Journalism from the Dawood Global Foundation of Pakistan.

Her works have appeared in the Afriworiliterary Project Anthology; The Different Shades of a Feminine Mind (2017) and the 84 Bottles of Wine For Wole Soyinka Anthology (2018).

In her spare time, she offers resume writing services and blogs. Check out her blog here.

If you got to the bottom… hooray. Don’t forget to check out my other post on ‘Memorable Quotes from Anne with an E’  here

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